3 facts about thomas paine

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3 facts about thomas paine

Thomas Paines Rights of Man: A Biography by Christopher Hitchens

Thomas Paine was one of the greatest advocates of freedom in history, and his Declaration of the Rights of Man, first published in 1791, is the key to his reputation. Inspired by his outrage at Edmund Burke’s attack on the French Revolution, Paine’s text is a passionate defense of man’s inalienable rights. Since its publication, Rights of Man has been celebrated, criticized, maligned, suppressed, and co-opted. But in Thomas Paine’s Rights of Man, the polemicist and commentator Christopher Hitchens, “at his characteristically incisive best,” marvels at its forethought and revels in its contentiousness (The Times, London). Hitchens is a political descendant of the great pamphleteer, “a Tom Paine for our troubled times.” (The Independent, London) In this “engaging account of Paine’s life and times [that is] well worth reading” he demonstrates how Paine’s book forms the philosophical cornerstone of the United States, and how, “in a time when both rights and reason are under attack,” Thomas Paine’s life and writing “will always be part of the arsenal on which we shall need to depend.” (New Statesman)
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Thomas Paine's Common Sense Explained

Five Fascinating Facts about Thomas Paine

January 29, ] [Note 1] — June 8, was an English-born American political activist, philosopher, political theorist, and revolutionary. He authored the two most influential pamphlets at the start of the American Revolution and inspired the patriots in to declare independence from Great Britain. Padover described him as "a corsetmaker by trade, a journalist by profession, and a propagandist by inclination". Virtually every rebel read or listened to a reading of his powerful pamphlet Common Sense , proportionally the all-time best-selling [5] [6] American title, which crystallized the rebellious demand for independence from Great Britain. His The American Crisis — was a pro-revolutionary pamphlet series. Common Sense was so influential that John Adams said: "Without the pen of the author of Common Sense , the sword of Washington would have been raised in vain". He wrote Rights of Man , in part a defense of the French Revolution against its critics.

In alone it is thought to have sold in excess of , copies. Paine narrowly escaped execution. It was while he was in prison that he would write The Age of Reason. However, since he was suffering from a fever, the guards had agreed to keep his door open to allow fresh air into his cell. As a result, the door was chalked — but on the inside. He had narrowly escaped the guillotine. Only six people attended his funeral when he died in

Journalist in America

Thomas Paine was an influential 18th-century writer of essays and pamphlets. Among them were "The Age of Reason," regarding the place of religion in society; "Rights of Man," a piece defending the French Revolution; and "Common Sense," which was published during the American Revolution. Paine received little formal education but did learn to read, write and perform arithmetic. At the age of 13, he began working with his father as stay maker the thick rope stays used on sailing ships in Thetford, a shipbuilding town. Some sources state he and his father were corset makers, but most historians cite this as an example of slanders spread by his enemies. He later worked as an officer of the excise, hunting smugglers and collecting liquor and tobacco taxes.

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