2 dollars a day summary

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2 dollars a day summary

$2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America by Kathryn Edin

A revelatory account of poverty in America so deep that we, as a country, don’t think it exists

Jessica Compton’s family of four would have no cash income unless she donated plasma twice a week at her local donation center in Tennessee. Modonna Harris and her teenage daughter Brianna in Chicago often have no food but spoiled milk on weekends.

After two decades of brilliant research on American poverty, Kathryn Edin noticed something she hadn’t seen since the mid-1990s — households surviving on virtually no income. Edin teamed with Luke Shaefer, an expert on calculating incomes of the poor, to discover that the number of American families living on $2.00 per person, per day, has skyrocketed to 1.5 million American households, including about 3 million children.

Where do these families live? How did they get so desperately poor? Edin has “turned sociology upside down” (Mother Jones) with her procurement of rich — and truthful — interviews. Through the book’s many compelling profiles, moving and startling answers emerge.

The authors illuminate a troubling trend: a low-wage labor market that increasingly fails to deliver a living wage, and a growing but hidden landscape of survival strategies among America’s extreme poor. More than a powerful exposé, $2.00 a Day delivers new evidence and new ideas to our national debate on income inequality.
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1.5 million Americans are living on less than $2 per day

In this first chapter, Edin and Shaefer bring to light welfare, and how it has evolved over the years. It discusses Modonna's experience of being.
Kathryn Edin

2 dollars a day book summary

The availability of items requested from other libraries may depend on the policies of the other libraries. After two decades of research on American poverty, Kathryn Edin noticed something she hadn't seen since the mids -- households surviving on virtually no income. Edin teamed with Luke Shaefer, an expert on calculating incomes of the poor, to discover that the number of American families living o A revelatory account of poverty in America so deep that we, as a country, don't think it exists Jessica Compton's family of four would have no cash income unless she donated plasma twice a week at her local donation center in Tennessee. Modonna Harris and her teenage daughter Brianna in Chicago often have no food but spoiled milk on weekends. After two decades of brilliant research on American poverty, Kathryn Edin noticed something she hadn't seen since the mids -- households surviving on virtually no income.

From the late s to the mids, a number of developments turned out to have profound effects on destitute families in the United States, which Kathryn J. Edin and H. Critics of welfare repeatedly argued that the increase of unwed mothers was mainly due to rising rates of welfare payments through Aid to Families With Dependent Children A. Designed as a block grant, giving states considerably more latitude in how they spent government money for welfare than A. States were allowed to impose even shorter time limits.

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Cost-of-living data show that such families pay so much for shelter they risk being unable to afford other essential expenses. By this standard, there is no longer any state in America where a family supported by a full-time minimum-wage worker can find a two-bedroom apartment at fair-market rents without becoming cost burdened. - What's it like to have no source of income? That's life for millions of Americans, although the political debate barely acknowledges that reality.

The writing drew me in and the stories kept me reading. Most Americans agree that the poor deserve government assistance, but those same people also respond with vitriol at the idea of welfare as a system that encourages entitlement, promotes. Put simply, this book advocates for the full implementation of available welfare dollars in this country combined with an expansion of at least semi- desirable jobs and an increase in minimum wage. Than two dollars a day in every. In it, they report on the roughly 1.

By Dale Keiger. Kathryn Edin has been an itinerant scholar of the poor for more than 20 years. She is a sociologist who works like an anthropologist, melding numbers and narrative to examine in illuminating detail the lives of poor people all over the United States. In the summer of , Edin was in the seventh year of a long-term study of children born in public housing in the early s. At Latrobe Homes, a unit housing project in East Baltimore, she encountered the year-old woman she calls Ashley. She just looked depressed, no expression on her face.

Rate this book. Modonna Harris and her teenage daughter Brianna in Chicago often have no food but spoiled milk on weekends. Where do these families live? How did they get so desperately poor? Edin has "turned sociology upside down" Mother Jones with her procurement of rich - and truthful - interviews. Through the book's many compelling profiles, moving and startling answers emerge.

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  2. Bledatcrevjum says:

    $ A Day by Kaycey Jones on Prezi

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